How was the www created?

The development of the World Wide Web was initiated in 1989 by Tim Berners-Lee and his colleagues at CERN, an international scientific organization based in Geneva, Switzerland. They created a protocol, the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), which standardized communication between servers and clients. Tim Berners-Lee, a British scientist, invented the World Wide Web (WWW) in 1989, while working at CERN. The website was originally conceived and developed to meet the demand for automated information exchange between scientists from universities and institutes around the world.

The Web was originally conceived and developed to meet the demand for automated information exchange between scientists from universities and institutes around the world. Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web while working at CERN in 1989, applying the concept of hyperlink that by then had existed for several decades. He developed the first web server, the first web browser, and a document formatting protocol, called Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), which based on the concepts of the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML). After publishing the markup language in 1991 and publishing the browser source code for public use in 1993, many other web browsers were soon developed, with Mosaic by Marc Andreessen (later Netscape Navigator), which was particularly easy to use and install, and is often credited with triggering the boom of Internet from the 1990s.

It was a graphical browser that ran on several popular office and home computers, and brought multimedia content to non-technical users by including images and text on the same page. Sir Tim Berners-Lee is a British computer scientist. He was born in London, and his parents were early computer scientists, working on one of the first computers.